Macular Degeneration Symptoms

Macular degeneration, or age-related macular degeneration (AMD), is an eye disease that affects the central retina or macula. AMD usually produces a painless, slow vision loss. However, in rare cases, vision loss can suddenly occur. Early macular degeneration symptoms include shadowy spaces in your central vision or you may have unusually fuzzy or distorted vision. There is currently no cure for AMD, and only limited treatments exist, but lutein may be a possible treatment for patients who have AMD.
One of the ways of diagnosing AMD is by the use of an Amsler grid. This is a chart consisting of black lines that has a black reference dot in the center. Someone who has AMD may see some of the lines as blurred or wavy and having some dark areas at its center.

Age-related macular degeneration symptoms include some of the following:

  • Decreased or blurred central close-up and distance vision. This is often delayed as the patient subconsciously ignores the eye with the worst vision before the development of this condition in the patient’s previously good eye.
  • Scotomas, or blind spots, are a direct result of a patient’s lost macular function.
  • Straight lines that look either irregular or bent, which are called metamorphopsia, and objects appear to be a different shape or color in each of the eyes.
  • Another one of the macular dengeneration symptoms is that objects may appear smaller in one eye of a patient than the other eye. This condition is known as micropsia which may be an indication of a bulging and swelling of the macula. This leads to putting a greater distance between the eye’s individual phtoreceptors. This will cause the brain to give an interpretation that the object seems to be smaller than seen by the patient’s good eye.

The National Eye Institute, or NEI, conducted a study that potent antioxidant and vitamin supplements had on AMD patients. Results indicated there was a 25 percent risk-reduction for advanced macular degeneration disease progression to stages of vision-loss. The NEI conducted a second study in the year 2009, and researched the effects that lutein had on AMD to prove that it can help in the prevention of vision-loss.

Lutein is a natural antioxidant that is found throughout the body, but it is especially abundant in the eye. It provides protective capabilities for the eye such as filtering harmful light. Lutein also strengthens the macula of the eye. The weakening and loss of natural lutein takes place as we age. You can find lutein in orange-and-yellow-colored vegetables and fruits, eggs, leafy, green vegetables as well as in supplement form.

One of the most important findings in the treatment of macular degeneration symptoms is lutein. Clinical studies suggest that there is a relationship between dietary supplements containing lutein and the health of the area of the macula as well as the lens of the eye. As there are some factors that you have no control over, such as gender, age, and heredity, you are in control of your diet and lifestyle. Dr. Johanna Seddon, currently of the Harvard University School of Medicine, had a study published that examined the effects of the consumption of certain carotenoids and the prevalence of AMD. This study found that when people took 6mg of lutein each day, this led to a 43 percent lower chance of contracting AMD.

Macular Degeneration Symptoms

Macular degeneration, or age-related macular degeneration (AMD), is an eye disease that affects the central retina or macula. AMD usually produces a painless, slow vision loss. However, in rare cases, vision loss can suddenly occur. Early macular degeneration symptoms include shadowy spaces in your central vision or you may have unusually fuzzy or distorted vision. There is currently no cure for AMD, and only limited treatments exist, but lutein may be a possible treatment for patients who have AMD.
One of the ways of diagnosing AMD is by the use of an Amsler grid. This is a chart consisting of black lines that has a black reference dot in the center. Someone who has AMD may see some of the lines as blurred or wavy and having some dark areas at its center.

Age-related macular degeneration symptoms include some of the following:

  • Decreased or blurred central close-up and distance vision. This is often delayed as the patient subconsciously ignores the eye with the worst vision before the development of this condition in the patient’s previously good eye.
  • Scotomas, or blind spots, are a direct result of a patient’s lost macular function.
  • Straight lines that look either irregular or bent, which are called metamorphopsia, and objects appear to be a different shape or color in each of the eyes.
  • Another one of the macular dengeneration symptoms is that objects may appear smaller in one eye of a patient than the other eye. This condition is known as micropsia which may be an indication of a bulging and swelling of the macula. This leads to putting a greater distance between the eye’s individual phtoreceptors. This will cause the brain to give an interpretation that the object seems to be smaller than seen by the patient’s good eye.

The National Eye Institute, or NEI, conducted a study that potent antioxidant and vitamin supplements had on AMD patients. Results indicated there was a 25 percent risk-reduction for advanced macular degeneration disease progression to stages of vision-loss. The NEI conducted a second study in the year 2009, and researched the effects that lutein had on AMD to prove that it can help in the prevention of vision-loss.

Lutein is a natural antioxidant that is found throughout the body, but it is especially abundant in the eye. It provides protective capabilities for the eye such as filtering harmful light. Lutein also strengthens the macula of the eye. The weakening and loss of natural lutein takes place as we age. You can find lutein in orange-and-yellow-colored vegetables and fruits, eggs, leafy, green vegetables as well as in supplement form.

One of the most important findings in the treatment of macular degeneration symptoms is lutein. Clinical studies suggest that there is a relationship between dietary supplements containing lutein and the health of the area of the macula as well as the lens of the eye. As there are some factors that you have no control over, such as gender, age, and heredity, you are in control of your diet and lifestyle. Dr. Johanna Seddon, currently of the Harvard University School of Medicine, had a study published that examined the effects of the consumption of certain carotenoids and the prevalence of AMD. This study found that when people took 6mg of lutein each day, this led to a 43 percent lower chance of contracting AMD.

Macular Degeneration Symptoms

Macular degeneration, or age-related macular degeneration (AMD), is an eye disease that affects the central retina or macula. AMD usually produces a painless, slow vision loss. However, in rare cases, vision loss can suddenly occur. Early macular degeneration symptoms include shadowy spaces in your central vision or you may have unusually fuzzy or distorted vision. There is currently no cure for AMD, and only limited treatments exist, but lutein may be a possible treatment for patients who have AMD.
One of the ways of diagnosing AMD is by the use of an Amsler grid. This is a chart consisting of black lines that has a black reference dot in the center. Someone who has AMD may see some of the lines as blurred or wavy and having some dark areas at its center.

Age-related macular degeneration symptoms include some of the following:

  • Decreased or blurred central close-up and distance vision. This is often delayed as the patient subconsciously ignores the eye with the worst vision before the development of this condition in the patient’s previously good eye.
  • Scotomas, or blind spots, are a direct result of a patient’s lost macular function.
  • Straight lines that look either irregular or bent, which are called metamorphopsia, and objects appear to be a different shape or color in each of the eyes.
  • Another one of the macular dengeneration symptoms is that objects may appear smaller in one eye of a patient than the other eye. This condition is known as micropsia which may be an indication of a bulging and swelling of the macula. This leads to putting a greater distance between the eye’s individual phtoreceptors. This will cause the brain to give an interpretation that the object seems to be smaller than seen by the patient’s good eye.

The National Eye Institute, or NEI, conducted a study that potent antioxidant and vitamin supplements had on AMD patients. Results indicated there was a 25 percent risk-reduction for advanced macular degeneration disease progression to stages of vision-loss. The NEI conducted a second study in the year 2009, and researched the effects that lutein had on AMD to prove that it can help in the prevention of vision-loss.

Lutein is a natural antioxidant that is found throughout the body, but it is especially abundant in the eye. It provides protective capabilities for the eye such as filtering harmful light. Lutein also strengthens the macula of the eye. The weakening and loss of natural lutein takes place as we age. You can find lutein in orange-and-yellow-colored vegetables and fruits, eggs, leafy, green vegetables as well as in supplement form.

One of the most important findings in the treatment of macular degeneration symptoms is lutein. Clinical studies suggest that there is a relationship between dietary supplements containing lutein and the health of the area of the macula as well as the lens of the eye. As there are some factors that you have no control over, such as gender, age, and heredity, you are in control of your diet and lifestyle. Dr. Johanna Seddon, currently of the Harvard University School of Medicine, had a study published that examined the effects of the consumption of certain carotenoids and the prevalence of AMD. This study found that when people took 6mg of lutein each day, this led to a 43 percent lower chance of contracting AMD.

Macular Degeneration Symptoms

Macular degeneration, or age-related macular degeneration (AMD), is an eye disease that affects the central retina or macula. AMD usually produces a painless, slow vision loss. However, in rare cases, vision loss can suddenly occur. Early macular degeneration symptoms include shadowy spaces in your central vision or you may have unusually fuzzy or distorted vision. There is currently no cure for AMD, and only limited treatments exist, but lutein may be a possible treatment for patients who have AMD.
One of the ways of diagnosing AMD is by the use of an Amsler grid. This is a chart consisting of black lines that has a black reference dot in the center. Someone who has AMD may see some of the lines as blurred or wavy and having some dark areas at its center.

Age-related macular degeneration symptoms include some of the following:

  • Decreased or blurred central close-up and distance vision. This is often delayed as the patient subconsciously ignores the eye with the worst vision before the development of this condition in the patient’s previously good eye.
  • Scotomas, or blind spots, are a direct result of a patient’s lost macular function.
  • Straight lines that look either irregular or bent, which are called metamorphopsia, and objects appear to be a different shape or color in each of the eyes.
  • Another one of the macular dengeneration symptoms is that objects may appear smaller in one eye of a patient than the other eye. This condition is known as micropsia which may be an indication of a bulging and swelling of the macula. This leads to putting a greater distance between the eye’s individual phtoreceptors. This will cause the brain to give an interpretation that the object seems to be smaller than seen by the patient’s good eye.

The National Eye Institute, or NEI, conducted a study that potent antioxidant and vitamin supplements had on AMD patients. Results indicated there was a 25 percent risk-reduction for advanced macular degeneration disease progression to stages of vision-loss. The NEI conducted a second study in the year 2009, and researched the effects that lutein had on AMD to prove that it can help in the prevention of vision-loss.

Lutein is a natural antioxidant that is found throughout the body, but it is especially abundant in the eye. It provides protective capabilities for the eye such as filtering harmful light. Lutein also strengthens the macula of the eye. The weakening and loss of natural lutein takes place as we age. You can find lutein in orange-and-yellow-colored vegetables and fruits, eggs, leafy, green vegetables as well as in supplement form.

One of the most important findings in the treatment of macular degeneration symptoms is lutein. Clinical studies suggest that there is a relationship between dietary supplements containing lutein and the health of the area of the macula as well as the lens of the eye. As there are some factors that you have no control over, such as gender, age, and heredity, you are in control of your diet and lifestyle. Dr. Johanna Seddon, currently of the Harvard University School of Medicine, had a study published that examined the effects of the consumption of certain carotenoids and the prevalence of AMD. This study found that when people took 6mg of lutein each day, this led to a 43 percent lower chance of contracting AMD.